9 Quick and Simple Ways To Get The Best Sleep Of Your Life...Tonight

We all know the feeling of being too tired to function. But lack of sleep can do even more harm to us than we realize.

Most Americans get less than 6 hours of sleep each night, when 7-8 hours are needed!

This causes not only a bad mood but also an increased risk for high blood pressure, stroke, depression, car accidents, bad memory, and even causes a spike in stress hormones which leads to weight gain.

By getting more sleep, you can solve an array of issues you face on a daily basis, while also improving your health, skin, body, and mood.

Dr. Mathison really worries about everyone getting quality sleep, so here are her 9 quick and simple ways to get the best sleep of your life...and you don't have to wait to feel great; you can start tonight!*


†The information and supporting material on this website are for informational purposes only. The objective of this website is to offer broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health, wellness, and cosmetic topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
Not only does a nicely made bed look pleasing to the eye, but the tidy look and feel can stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system which relaxes the body.
We spend almost 1/3 of our lives in our bed, so make it worth your while! Spend the money to get a quality mattress, a bed frame, blankets, pillows, and sheets that you LOVE and want to spend time in.
Studies have shown that sleeping in temperatures less than 68 degrees leads to better and more restful sleep. Try cracking a window, turning down the thermostat, or keeping a fan going while you sleep to circulate the air.
People react to caffeine differently, but it is a good idea to cut yourself off from the stimulation a good 6 hours before you plan to go to sleep...and stick with it! People who are more sensitive to caffeine should aim for 8 or even 10 hours before.
The blue light and stimulation of electronics such as cell phones, TVs, and computers can really make it difficult to get to sleep at night. Try cutting yourself off a good hour before bedtime or at least using an app that cuts out the blue light from the device screen.
Even the small lights from chargers, alarm clocks, and other gadgets can keep you from getting restful sleep. Make sure to cover these light sources as best you can, and while you are at it, buy some black out curtains for your windows. They are fabulous and help you sleep deeply!
-Vitamin D: taking 1000 iU of vitamin D in the morning can help regulate your body and your sleep
-Omega 3: keeping your fatty acid levels at bay will help relieve stress and cause better sleep
-Magnesium: most people have low levels and taking a supplement before bed is relaxing
-Tryptophan: the famous post-turkey nap time dose offers an aid to sleep and relaxation
-Melatonin: this hormone should not be taken regularly, but can sure help aid sleep while travelling
The body responds to consistency, so taking a bath before bed, listening to relaxing music, reading, or journaling can help trigger your mind that it is time to sleep. You can also try dabbing on great sleep aid oils such as vanilla, sandalwood, and lavender.
If you can't fall asleep, don't get frustrated: it will just make falling asleep more difficult. Try focusing on a different non-tech activity such as listening to music, deep breathing, journaling, or reading...all with no blue light sources, of course.

Now your job is to go home, reward yourself with some relaxation, use some of these tips, and have the most fantastic sleep you can remember.

Sweet Dreams!


†The information and supporting material on this website are for informational purposes only. The objective of this website is to offer broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health, wellness, and cosmetic topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Dr. Susan Mathison

Dr. Mathison started Catalyst Medical Center as an independent physician. She compassionately cares for patients, specializing in Otolaryngology (Ear, Nose, and Throat), head/neck surgery and facial plastic surgery. She also provides treatment for allergies, sleep disorders and skincare. She received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University, Stanford, CA and her medical degree from the University of Texas-Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX. After completing seven years of specialty training in Seattle at the University of WA, she returned home to Fargo in 1997. She enjoys spending time with her family and many longtime friends.

Catalyst Can Help You Sleep Better

Still struggling to get restful sleep? Catalyst Medial Center and the fantastic Dr. Mathison, board-certified in sleep, can help discover what is causing your difficulty and choose what actions to take to make sure you have the best possible sleep, every night.