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What To Watch For: Signs Of Skin Cancer

Why Should You Care?

Skin Cancer is a big concern. It is the #1 most common cancer in US adults and more than 3.5 million Americans fight skin cancer each year. If those statistics don't get you thinking, maybe this will:

Early and accurate diagnosis of skincare is key. Whether it is non-melanoma skin cancer such as basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, or the more threatening melanoma skin cancer itself, skin cancer can be fought, so long as it is caught in the early stages.


†The information and supporting material on this website are for informational purposes only. The objective of this website is to offer broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health, wellness, and cosmetic topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

What To Look For:

Non-melanoma Skin Cancer Symptoms

Non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) has a low likelihood of spreading to the rest of the body, but must still be taken seriously. Signs include:


  • abnormal or unusual skin growths, bumps, or sores that don't seem to go away
  • brownish scars or flesh-colored lesions on the chest
  • pale or waxy translucent bumps on the head or neck (many have visible blood vessels as well)
  • firm lumps on the skin
  • red scaly patch on the head, neck, hands or arms

*The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes.

Melanoma Skin Cancer Symptoms

Melanoma skin cancers are much more likely to spread to the lymph nodes or other parts of the body. This means that early detection and treatment is absolutely essential. Use the ABCDE Rule to watch out for:

  •  Asymmetry: irregular shape or if one half of a mole looks different than the other
  • B  Border: irregular, blurred, rough, or notched edges of a mole
  • C  Color: if a mole is non-even in color or has changed shade
  • D  Diameter: a mole larger than 1/4 of an inch (the size of a pencil eraser)
  • E  Evolving: if a mole is shrinking, growing, changing color, or feels differently, such as itching.

*The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes.

Keep In Mind:

It is best to get your skin screened by your primary physician or dermatologist at least once a year, but make sure to check your own body monthly. 

Always contact a physician if you have a sore that does not heal, a mole that has pigment, redness, or swelling outside its border, if you have an area that is itchy, tender, or painful, or if a mole changes in texture, oozes, or bleeds. 

Early and accurate diagnosis is KEY



†The information and supporting material on this website are for informational purposes only. The objective of this website is to offer broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health, wellness, and cosmetic topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Need a Skin Check?

Catalyst Medical Center is home to the amazing Catalyst Dermatology.
We can help answer your questions and ensure that your skin is healthy, or care for it as needed.
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